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10 Largest Stadiums With A Capacity Of Over 100,000 Spectators

Here is a list of 10 Largest Stadiums in the world With A Capacity Of Over 100,000 Spectators at a single time.

Rungrado May First Stadium

Rungrado May First Stadium
Also known as May Day Stadium, Rungrado May First Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea. It is regarded as the largest stadium in the world by capacity. It is currently used for football matches, a few athletics matches, but most often for Arirang performances (gymnastics and artistic games). The stadium can seat 150,000, which is the largest stadium capacity in the world. Its name comes from Rungra Islet in the Taedong River, upon which it is situated, and May Day, the international day celebrating labour and particularly celebrated among communists. Its total floor space is over 207,000 meter square across eight stories, and the lobes of its roof peak at more than 60 m (197 ft) from the ground.

 

Salt Lake Stadium

Salt Lake Stadium
Located in Bidhannagar, Kolkata, West Bengal, Salt Lake stadium (formerly known as Yuva Bharati Krirangan) is the largest stadium in India and second-largest in the world. It is currently used for association football matches and athletics. The stadium was built in 1984 and holds 120,000 people in a three-tier configuration. The stadium covers an area of 76.40 acres (309,200 m square). It was inaugurated in January, 1984. The floodlights which illuminate the stadium consist of 624 bulbs of 2 kW each and two electronic scoreboards consisting of 36,000 bulbs of 25 watt each. Football is the main sport in this stadium but it also hosts important athletic events. It has hosted the SAF Games in 1987 and various national athletics events in India.

 

Michigan Stadium

Michigan Stadium
Nicknamed as ‘The Big house’, Michigan Stadium* is a football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. Michigan Stadium is the largest stadium in the United States and the third largest stadium in the world with an official capacity of 109,901. Michigan Stadium is the site of the University of Michigan’s main graduation ceremonies. it has also hosted hockey games. The field was converted from natural turf to Field-Turf in 2003. In 2010, it was upgraded with a brighter and higher quality version of field turf called Duraspine. The one “extra seat” in Michigan Stadium is said to be reserved for former athletic director Fritz Crisler, although its location is not specified.

 

Beaver Stadium

Beaver Stadium
Located in the campus of The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, Beaver Stadium* is named for James A. Beaver, a former governor of Pennsylvania (1887–91) and president of the university’s board of trustees. The stadium is home to the Penn State Nittany Lions of the Big Ten Conference since 1960. Beaver Stadium has an official seating capacity of 106,572, making it currently the fourth-largest stadium in the world. A major and somewhat controversial construction project took place in 2001, raising the stadium’s total capacity to 106,572. An upper deck was added to the south end of the stadium, blocking the view of neighboring Nittany Mountain (which had sentimental value for some fans).

 

Estadio Azteca

Estadio Azteca
Located in Santa Ursula, Mexico City, Mexico, Estadio Azteca is the official home stadium of the Mexico national football team and the Mexican team Club America. The stadium was the venue for association football in the 1968 Summer Olympics. It has the honor of being the only stadium in the world to have hosted two FIFA World Cup Finals. In the 1970 World Cup final, Brazil versus Italy and in the 1986 World Cup final, Argentina versus West Germany. The name “Azteca” is a tribute to the Aztec heritage of Mexico City. The Capacity of the stadium is 105,000 and Field dimensions are 105 x 68 m. The stadium has been given the nickname of “Coloso de Santa Ursula” which, in English, means “Colossus of Saint Ursula”, due to its large structure.

 

Neyland Stadium

Neyland Stadium
Located in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, Neyland Stadium* serves primarily as the home of the Tennessee Volunteers football team, but is also used to host large conventions and has been a site for several NFL exhibition games. The stadium’s official capacity is 102,455, which makes it sixth largest stadium in the world. The stadium is named for University of Tennessee football coach Robert Neyland (1892–1962). Neyland Stadium is occasionally used for concerts, political rallies, and religious gatherings. Constructed in 1921, the stadium has undergone 16 expansion projects, latest being the addition of the Tennessee Terrace in 2010, which raised the capacity to 102,455.

 

Ohio Stadium

Ohio Stadium
Located in the campus of The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA, Ohio Stadium* is the home venue of the Ohio State Buckeyes football team. Since 2007, the capacity is listed at 102,329, though crowds above 105,000 are common. It is the largest stadium by capacity in the state of Ohio, the fourth largest football stadium in the United States, and the seventh largest stadium in the world. Ohio Stadium was added to the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service on March 22, 1974. It is popularly known as “The Horseshoe” because of its shape. when completed in 1922, the stadium’s original capacity was 66,210 and at that time it was the largest poured concrete structure in the world.

 

Bryant–Denny Stadium

Bryant–Denny Stadium
Located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA, Bryant-Denny Stadium* is the home stadium for the University of Alabama football team. The stadium opened in 1929, and was originally named Denny Stadium, in honor of former University of Alabama president George Hutchenson Denny. The stadium’s name was amended to Bryant–Denny Stadium in 1975 after the Alabama legislature chose to honor famed Alabama coach Paul “Bear” Bryant. Expanded upto eight times, it has a seating capacity of 101,821, and is the eighth largest stadium by seating in the world. The Stadium opened on September 28, 1929, with a surface of grass (1929–1967) and then to AstroTurf (1968–1991). Later in 1992, it was again switched back to grass.

 

Darrell K Royal – Texas Memorial Stadium

Darrell K Royal - Texas Memorial Stadium
Formerly known as War Memorial Stadium and Texas Memorial Stadium, Darrell K Royal – Texas Memorial Stadium* is located in Austin, Texas, USA and has been home to the University of Texas at Austin Longhorns football team since 1924. The current official stadium seating capacity of 100,119 makes the stadium the ninth largest stadium in the world. The University of Texas honored legendary football coach Darrell K Royal, who never served, but did lead Texas to three national championships and eleven Southwest Conference titles, by officially naming the stadium after him in 1996. The surface of the field has been changed four times:- Natural grass (1924–1968), Artificial turf (1969–1995), Natural grass (1996–2008), Field Turf (2009–Present).

 

Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG)

Melbourne Cricket Ground
Located in Yarra Park, Melbourne, Australia, Melbourne Cricket Ground is home to the Melbourne Cricket Club. With a capacity of 100,018, it is the tenth largest stadium in the world, the largest in Australia, the largest stadium for playing cricket, and holds the world record for the highest light towers at any sporting venue. Apart from cricket the stadium has been used for Rugby, Soccer, Tennis, Cycling and concerts. It also has been a venue for Olympic and Commonwealth Games. Often referred to by locals as “The G”, the MCG is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register and was included on the Australian National Heritage List on 26 December 2005. It is referred to within Victoria as the “Spiritual Home of Australian Sport”.

 

* American football stadiums, not to be confused with association football or soccer.

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